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Pre-Diabetes Knowing Your Chances Reduce Your Risk

by Out and About STYLE Mag

With a modern lifestyle come big health issues like pre-diabetes - a pre-diagnosis of diabetes that millions of people suffer from. Reasons including lack of physical activity, bad diet and high- stress levels could lead to pre-diabetes. 

This pre-diagnosis is more likely than not a warning sign of a bigger problem surfacing – the dreaded chronic diabetes. It occurs when you have a higher than normal level of blood sugar, although not high enough to officially be diabetes. 

WHY KNOWING YOUR RISK MATTERS?

Knowing your risk of diabetes is important because it makes you aware of your chances to develop Type 2 diabetes. It also puts you in the position to reflect on your current lifestyle and apply changes to lower your risk. 

With an idea of your risk through a pre-diagnosis, you will also be able to prevent it from developing into Type 2 diabetes. Addressing overweight issues and eating only whole foods can get your blood sugar level back to normal. It will also help to manage and keep a healthy weight and start a healthy exercise routine. 

By changing your lifestyle here and there, you can lower your diabetes risk as well as prevent associated conditions like vision loss, heart disease, kidney failure and nerve damage.  

AM I AT RISK? 

What are the signs and symptoms you might be at risk of developing diabetes? Note – You might not notice any of these in the pre-diabetes stage even if you have a higher than normal blood glucose, but then, you may still notice them. 

  • Sudden weight loss even 
  • with high food consumption 
  • Hungrier than normal 
  • Frequent urination 
  • Feeling more tired than normal 
  • Being thirsty more often 
RISK FACTORS AND COMMON CAUSES 

Your body begins having trouble processing and using insulin, and that’s when pre-diabetes develop. Insulin transports glucose into each cell through the bloodstream. With pre-diabetes, your body isn’t making enough or not using insulin correctly; a condition called insulin resistance. If your body has insufficient insulin supply or is resistant to it (insulin), it accumulates too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher blood glucose level that may result in pre-diabetes. The same risk factors occur with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. Here are some of them that you need to know. 

GESTATIONAL DIABETES 

Did you develop diabetes while pregnant? If yes, your risk of developing Type 2, later on, is more likely. 

POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME (PCOS) 

This condition is related to insulin resistance. What’s happening is that you may be at a higher risk due to the many cysts, of which some may be due to insulin resistance, forming in your ovaries. 

LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 

This issue is common among those who are obese or overweight. People who are not mindful of their current excess weight can be at high risk of diabetes, especially if they do not tend to move much due to a constant feeling of sluggishness. 

LACK OF EXERCISE 

Apart from feeling sluggish, people with pre-diabetes may also have lack any kind of physical activity. This problem is common among those who are overweight. And if you’re less active, you can be at higher risk of pre-diabetes. 

AGE 

You’re likely to be at a higher risk of developing pre-diabetes if you’re older, say above 45 years old. 

FAMILY HISTORY 

You’re more likely to develop pre-diabetes if you have a close family member who has or has had it because it has a hereditary factor, too. 

HEALTH CONDITIONS 

People with high bad cholesterol levels or hypertension also have an increased risk of diabetes. 

OBESITY AND OVERWEIGHT 

Do you have at least a 25 body mass index? Your chances of developing Type 2 diabetes are higher, especially if you have excess visceral fat in your abdomen. The fat cells in that area will make you more insulin resistant if you are already at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. 

ETHNICITY OR RACE

Some groups have higher tendencies to develop this condition, and a few of them include Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans and Native Americans. 

HYPOTHYROIDISM 

If you have this condition, your body isn’t circulating enough thyroid hormones or its thyroid gland is not functioning well; thus, you can develop Type 2 diabetes if you also have pre-diabetes. 

TIPS TO AVOID DEVELOPING DIABETES 

Making simple lifestyle changes is your best bet to prevent the condition. To begin, here are some things you can do. You can get started with them and likely notice a big difference. 

MAKE TIME FOR EXERCISE. 

There is no excuse, no matter how busy you are. If you have pre-diabetes, you can still prevent it from becoming diabetes by incorporating moderate physical activity into your life. 

Even if it’s just 10 or 30 minutes a day, a few options include swimming, riding a bike or brisk walking. But if you have an underlying condition, consult your doctor about a safe exercise for you. 

EAT HEALTHILY. 

Stick with a healthy diet plan, and add foods like whole grains, fruits and vegetables to your diet. You can also think about adding lean protein sources, like chicken or fish.

REDUCE YOUR CALORIE INTAKE. 

Try having small servings instead of splurging in calories in one sitting. You must also drink water instead of sugary drinks. 

ARE YOU OVERWEIGHT? 

Strive and work hard to lose weight. You can prevent or delay it by simply losing seven percent of your weight. 

Weight loss does more than make you looking fab. It also reduces your risk of developing many other conditions like a heart attack, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. 

PRE-DIABETES IS PREVENTABLE 

When diagnosed earlier, it is not likely to develop into Type 2 diabetes or make you susceptible to more issues like obesity and heart attack. If you want to prevent pre-diabetes, you can start making simple lifestyle changes like adding exercise, planning your diet and reducing your calorie intake. Live a healthy lifestyle and prevent pre-diabetes! 

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